First

Reason: Clutter bombards our minds with excessive stimuli (visual, olfactory, tactile), causing our senses to work overtime on stimuli that aren’t necessary or important.

Remedie: Tackle de-cluttering as a family. If clutter has invaded your entire house, don’t tackle the job alone. Get the whole family involved by starting with a room everyone uses and making each person responsible for a section. If you’re on your own, start with one area at a time and finish de-cluttering that area before moving on to another. This will give you a sense of accomplishment as you see your successes little by little.

Second

Reason: Clutter distracts us by drawing our attention away from what our focus should be on.
Remedy: Create designated spaces for frequently used items and supplies so that you can quickly and easily find what you’re looking for when you need it. However, try to make these designated spaces “closed” spaces, such as drawers and cabinets. “Storing” things on open shelves or on top of your desk does not remove those visual stimuli that create stress and lessen the amount of open space that your mind “sees.”

Third

Reason: Clutter makes it more difficult to relax, both physically and mentally.

Remedy: If you don’t use it, don’t want it, or don’t need it, get rid of it. You can toss it, recycle it, or donate it (one person’s trash is another person’s treasure), but don’t keep it.¬†If you use it, but only rarely, store it in a box in the garage (or if it’s your office, in a high or low place) to leave easy-access space for things you use more often. Also, put a date on the box. With rare exceptions, if you haven’t opened the box in a year, whatever is inside is probably not something you need.

Fourth

Reason: Clutter constantly signals to our brains that our work is never done.

Remedy: When you take something out of its designated space to use it, put it back immediately after you’re finished with it. Sounds simple, but it actually takes practice and commitment.